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Hygiena International - Simple Rapid Test Systems to Verify Hygiene, Quality and Food Safety White Papers

Hygiena International - Simple Rapid Test Systems to Verify Hygiene, Quality and Food Safety

Hygiena: The Quality Monitoring Tool for Every Brewer’s Tool Kit Anecdotes from craft brewing booms of the past (c.1997) identify poor quality as a root problem leading to market contraction. While overall quality is shaped by a bevy of factors (ingredients, process, tools, and sheer artistry of the brewmaster), one common element of outstanding craft brewers who survived the bust is a commitment to controlling, measuring, and improving factors that influence end-product quality. Utilizing Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) and process management principles, craft brewers can reign in variability and process deviation to ensure consistently high-quality outcomes. This is a lesson learned for craft brewers rocketing to success in the modern craft brewing boom.
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Breaking New Boundaries: Simple Rapid Multiple Test System Dr Martin Easter notes that ATP bioluminescence is a well-established and recognised test that is mainly used for cleaning verification purpose in several industries. However, recent developments in hardware and reagent chemistry have made it specific for specified bacteria and other markers of food safety thereby extending is applications and uses.
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Control of Norovirus on a Cruise Ship Norovirus is the most prevalent cause of infectious gastroenteritis in England and Wales (HPA, 2013), It has a single-stranded RNA genome, a nonenveloped protein capsid protecting it from environmental degradation, and is highly infectious. Outbreaks of norovirus result in a substantial economic cost to the cruise industry and the disease burden is often difficult to quantify, with deaths and longterm outcomes often under reported.
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Instant Assessment of Hazards from Raw Meat In food law enforcement 45% of infringements are due to failures in general hygiene standards and 37% of all infringements are due to microbiological contamination. Meat and fish products have the largest number of microbiological infringement (29%) compared to all other foodstuffs and they present the largest single food safety hazard due to the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria. It has been calculated that every 1% reduction in the incidence of foodborne disease in the UK extrapolates to 10,000 fewer cases each year with a saving of £15 million.
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What do your Microbiology Test Results Really Mean? It is generally recognised that no measurement is perfect due to the uncertainties arising from many factors. This is even more complex in microbiology due the particulate nature of bacteria and their ability to reproduce by binary fission. This results in localised pockets of higher concentrations of bacteria where each individual represents a unique variable entity.
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Rapid Detection of Enterobacteriaceae in the Food Chain by Paul Meighan and Martin Easter, Hygiena International Ltd, Unit E, 3 Regal Way, Watford, Hertfordshire WD24 4YJ, UK.
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Cleaning and Hygiene: The Front Line Defence for Food Safety Preventing food poisoning is a key focus of any food safety system. Food poisoning is usually caused by the proliferation of undesirable microorganism. Cross-contamination and inadequate sanitation are major contributory factors. Accordingly Good Hygienic Practices are primary preventative controls measures that are part of the essential Operational Pre-Requisites Programs of modern food safety systems.
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Indicator Organisms and Faecal Contamination Microbiology is not an exact science.
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Cost Effective Cleaning Validation for Allergens Effective cleaning is usually identified as a pre-requisite for most GMP and HAACP plans in the food industry and cleaning is often considered a critical control point (CCP) for allergen control. Cleaning is designed to remove food residues that contain many common components such as ATP (adenosine triphosphate), protein and sugars. Some of these foods may also contain allergens. The more effective the cleaning procedure, then the lower the amount of food residues, and hence the lower the risk. Using the most sensitive detection methods gives the greatest assurance of cleaning efficacy.
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Novel Developments in ATP Bioluminescence Several industrial applications of ATP bioluminescence have been developed since the late 1970's. These have largely been non-specific applications, primarily for the direct, objective assessment of cleaning verification and also as a gross monitor of microbial biomass. Significant developments have been made, particularly over the past ten years. This article describes the most recent developments in reagents and instrumentation leading to the first specific test application for the detection of low numbers of pathogenic and indicator organisms within a working day.
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A Comparison of Commerical ATP Hygiene Monitoring Systems The application of ATP bioluminescence for hygiene monitoring provides a simple, rapid, direct, objective test for cleaning verfication. It is a sophisticated sensitive indicator test of hygienic status and potential risk.
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ATP Hygiene Monitoring Do Sanitisers Really Affect Measurements? The use of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a marker of cleaning and hygiene has been well established in industrial food processing since the early 1980s. The test method is called ATP bioluminescence which uses an enzyme called luciferase and its properties were determined by McElroy and Strehler in 1949.
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Precision and Accuracy in ATP Hygiene Testing ATP bioluminescence is a well established rapid method that gives instant results, and is used to measure cleanliness and hygiene. Advances in solid-state technology have enabled new instruments to be developed that deliver performance, convenience and robustness at low cost.
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Hygiene Monitoring in Support of Food Safety: A Review of Methods and Industry Trends Good Hygienic Practices are an esstential to ensure food safety. They are required by law under national and international Food Hygiene Regulations and are frequently considered as pre-requisites to food safety systems based on Hazard Analysis such as HACCP.
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Rapid Hygiene Tests in Support of Food Safety Exploding the myths about ATP hygiene monitoring.
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Allergen Control & Management: Practical Implications for Cleaning and Monitoring The control of allergens is a significant concern for food manufacturers. However, the absence of universally agreed acceptable allergen levels has led to the overuse of fail-safe warning or pre-cautionary labelling. This lack of guidance is causing a great deal of confusion on the best approach to control allergen risks.
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